Food Allergy Talk.com

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This is a basic dictionary of "odd" words that may be listed on ingredient labels.  These words may stand for a food that you may not know about.  (New laws have helped people to know when a potential allergen may be in a food-but just in case...)  If you would like to purchase the entire dictionary, please visit this page.

Adenosine Triphosphate-   Adenylic Acid.  An organic compound that is derived from adenosine.  A fundamental unit of nucleic acid, it serves as a source of energy for biochemical transformation in plants, photosynthesis, and also for many chemical reactions in the body, especially those associated with muscular activity. 

Acrylonitrile Copolymers-     used in packaging materials.  When heated to decomposition it emits acrid smoke and irritating fumes


Acrylic Resins-     Polymers of acrylics.  Used in waxy oils, base coats, protective coatings, and waterproofing.  Acrylates, if inhaled, can cause allergic reactions in humans

Acrylate-Acrylmide Resin-   Acrylic Acid.  Colorless, odorless crystals soluble in water and derived from acrylonitrile and sulfuric acid.  It is used as a clarifying agent in beet sugar and cane sugar juice and liquor or corn starch hydrolysate (5ppm by weight of juice, 10ppm by weight of liquor or hydrolysate).  It is also used in the manufacture of dyes, adhesives, and in permanent-press fabrics, nail enamels, and face masks.  It is toxic by skin absorption. 


ACRYLAMIDE-     Colorless, odorless crystals soluble in water and derived from arylonitrile and sulfuric acid. It is used in clarifying beet sugar or cane sugar juice ad in cornstarch. It is also used as a thickener and suspending agent in nonmed­icated animal feeds. It is toxic by skin absorption. 

Acimeton-     Lobamine.  Banthionine.  Cynaroine.  Methilanin.  Neston.  White crystalline platelets with a characteristic odor.  Used as a dietary supplement and nutrient.  Moderately toxic by ingestion and other routes. When heated to decomposition it emits toxic fumes.


Acifluoren, Sodium-     Herbicide.  FDA tolerances are 0.02 ppm residues in cattle and sheep, kidney and liver.  Residues in rice, milk, and eggs is tolerated at 0.1 ppm. 


Acidophilus-     A type of bacteria that ferments milk and has been used medically to treat intestinal disorders.

Acid-     an acid is a substance capable of turning blue litmus paper red and forming hydrogen ions when dissolved in water.  An acid aqueous solutionis one that has a pH of less than 7.  Citric Acid is an example of a widely used acid in foods.


2-Acetylthiazole-     Used in the manufacture of fungicides and dyes.


Acetylisoeugenol-     Isoeugenol acetate.  White crystals with a spicy, clove-like odor, it is used as an aroma and flavor carrier in foods.  In perfumery, it is used especially for carnation-type odors.


Acetylisoeugenol-     Isoeugenol accetate.  White Crystals with a spicy, clove-like odor, it is used as an aroma and flavor carrier in foods.  In perfumery, it is used especially for carnation-type odors. 


Acetylated Monoglycerides-     Emulsifiers used in food, food processing, and food packaging restricted only according to good manufacturing practices to accomplish the intended effect. 


Acetylated-     Any organic compound that has been heated with acetic anhydride or acetyl chloride to remove its water.  Acetylation is used to coat candy and other foods to hold moisture.  Acetic anhydride produces irritation and necrosis of tissues in vapor state and carries a warning against contact with skin and eyes. 


Acetyl Triethyl Cirate-     A clear oily, essentially odorless liquid used as a solvent and plasticizer.  Moderately toxic by ingestion.  When heated to decomposition it emits acrid smoke and fumes. 

 

Acetyl Triocetyl Citrate Pectin-     Citrus Pectin.  A jelly-forming powder obtained from citrus peel and used as a texturizer and thickening agent to form gels with sugars and acids.  Light in color.  It has no known toxicity.


2-Acetylthiazole-     Used in the manufacture of fungicides and dyes. 

2-Acetyl Pyrrole-     Light beige to yellow crystals with bread like odor used as a flavoring agent.  When heated to decomposition emits toxic fumes.  GRAS when used at a level not in excess of the amount reasonably required. 


2-Acetyl Pyrazine-     Colorless to pale yellow crystals or liquid with a sweet popcorn like odor.  Used as a flavoring agent.  Skin and eye irritant.  When heated to decomposition emits toxic fumes.  GRAS. 

Acetyl Propionyl-     Yellow liquid.  Soluble in water.  Used as a butterscotch or chocolate flavoring.  A synthetic flavoring agent that occurs naturally in coffee.  Also used in Strawberry, butter, carmel, fruit, rum, and cheese flavorings for beverages, ice cream, ices, candy, baked goods, gelatin desserts, and puddings.  No known toxicity.


n-Acetyl-L-Methionine-     (Free, Hydrated, Anhydrous, Sodium or Potassium Salts.)  Nutrient in foods except infant foods and products containing added nitrites/nitrates.  Limited to 3.1 percent by weight of the total protein in the food.  When heated to decomposition emits toxic fumes. 


Acetyl Hexamethyl Tetralin-     Used in perfumes.  It is closely related to acetyl ethyl tetramethyl tetralin, which was voluntarily removed from perfumes when it was reported to cause nerve damage in animals.  The "hexa" component was inserted to make the fragrances less volatile and less allergenic.


Acetyl Formic Acid- or -Pyruvaldehyde-     A synthetic flavoring, yellowish, with a pungent odor.  Formed as an intermediate in the metabolism or fermentation of carbohydrates and lactic acid.  Used in coffee, honey, and maple flavorings for beverages, ice cream, ices, candy, and baked goods.


Acetyl Eugenol- or -Eugenyl Acetate-     Acetic Acid.  A synthetic berry, fruit, mint, spice, and vanilla flavoring agent for beverages, ice cream, ices, candy, baked goods, chewing gum, and condiments. 

-Acetyl;3,(5 or 6)-Dimethylpyrazine, mixture of Isomers-     Flavoring agent.  The FDA has toxicology information on this food additive.


3-Acetyl-2,5-Dimethyl Furan-     Yellow liquid with a strong roasted nut odor, it is used as a flavoring agent.  When heated to decomposition it emits acrid smoke and irritating fumes.  The FDA has toxicology information on this food additive.  GRAS.


Acetyl-o-Creosol or o-Tolyl Acetate-     Acetic Acid.  A synthetic butter, carmel, fruit, honey, and cherry flavoring for beverages, ice cream, ices, candy, baked goods, chewing gum, and gelatin desserts.


Acetyl Butyryl or 2,3-Hexandione-     A synthetic strawberry, butter, citrus, banana, pineapple, rum, and cheese flavoring agent for beverages, ice cream, ices, candy, and baked goods.  No known toxicity.

Acetyl Benzoyl Peroxide-     White crystals decomposed by water and organic matter.  Used in medicine as a disinfectant.  It is used to bleach flour.  Toxic when ingested.


Acetylamino-5-nitrothiazole-     Acinitazole.  Trichloral.  Tritheom.  An animal drug used in turkeys and limited to 0.1 ppm in the bird’s flesh by the FDA.  When heated to decomposition emits toxic fumes.


Acetyl Acetone-           Acetoacetone.  Diacetyl methane colorless to slightly yellow liquid with a pleasant odor.  Used as a flavoring agent in food.  The FDA requires it not be used in excess of the amount reasonably required to accomplish the intended effect.  Moderately toxic if ingested, injected, or inhaled. 
Hydrocyanic acid followed by reaction with sulfuric acid.  It is used for making plastic and resins.  10/17/04-10/30/04Acrylic Acid-     Colorless liquid with an acrid odor, it is derived by condensing ethylene oxide with

Intrinsic Factor Complex-   A dietary supplement of liver-stomach concentration.  FDA has deemed it illegal.  4/9/05-6/3/05

NISIN- a new ingredient that contains MILK!  It has limited use in the U.S., and does contain milk protein.  People who are allergic to milk should avoid products with this ingredient!


Xylitol- Formerly made from birch wood, but now made from waste products from the pulp industry.  Xylitol has been reported to have diuretic effect but this has not been substantiated.  It is used in chewing gum and as an artificial sweetener.  It has been reported to sharply reduce cavities in teeth but costs more than sugar.  The reason is that, unlike sugar, it doesn't ferment in the mouth. ­Therefore, it is sold for foods that stay in the mouth for some time, such as gum, toffee, and mints. FDA preliminary reports cited it as a possible cancer-causing agent. Xylitol is now used in eleven European countries and the United States and Canada. It is also used in large amounts in the Soviet Union as a diabetic sweetener. Xylitol was evaluated by the F AO- WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives in Geneva, April 11-20, 1983. On the basis of submitted data, the com­mittee accepted that the adverse effects observed in British studies, in which cancer-prone rats were fed large doses of xylitol, were species-specific and could not be extrapolated to humans. Therefore, no limit on daily intake was set and no additional toxicological studies were recommended. It can cause stomach upsets when taken in large amounts. It may be of benefit to diabetics since xylitol metabolization does not involve insulin.  3/14/05-4/8/05.

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